Half of Utah lakes don’t meet water quality standard

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Half of Utah lakes don’t meet water quality standard

Ben Brown, with the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, filters a water sample from the San Juan River, in Montezuma Creek, Utah, in 2015. A report released Monday, June 13, shows that more than half of Utah lakes and nearly half of streams don’t meet water quality standards.
Hydrologic technician Ryan Parker gathers water samples from the San Juan River, in Montezuma Creek, Utah. A new report says metal levels were higher on parts of the San Juan River, which was affected by the Gold King Mine spill.
Walter Baker, director of the Utah Division of Water Quality, testifies during hearing a the Utah State Capitol on Tuesday, June 14 in Salt Lake City. A new report found that two parts of the river near the Four Corners region are impaired for aquatic life due to the presence of heavy metals like aluminum, copper, lead and zinc, said Baker.

Half of Utah lakes don’t meet water quality standard

Ben Brown, with the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, filters a water sample from the San Juan River, in Montezuma Creek, Utah, in 2015. A report released Monday, June 13, shows that more than half of Utah lakes and nearly half of streams don’t meet water quality standards.
Hydrologic technician Ryan Parker gathers water samples from the San Juan River, in Montezuma Creek, Utah. A new report says metal levels were higher on parts of the San Juan River, which was affected by the Gold King Mine spill.
Walter Baker, director of the Utah Division of Water Quality, testifies during hearing a the Utah State Capitol on Tuesday, June 14 in Salt Lake City. A new report found that two parts of the river near the Four Corners region are impaired for aquatic life due to the presence of heavy metals like aluminum, copper, lead and zinc, said Baker.
U.S. gives Navajos $465,000 to monitor river

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it’s giving the Navajo Nation $465,000 to monitor water quality in the San Juan River for contamination from a massive mine waste spill last August.
The EPA says the money is in addition to $1 million the agency agreed to give the tribe last October.
The new grant was announced Thursday.
An EPA-led cleanup crew inadvertently triggered the spill of 3 million gallons of acid mine waste from the Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado on Aug. 5. The spill tainted rivers in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah.
One of the rivers was the San Juan, which runs across Navajo land in New Mexico.
Navajo leaders have been highly critical of the EPA for causing the spill and for its response.

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